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Tasty Ways to Get More Fiber
It's good for you and your taste buds will thank you

By Joan McClusky
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- You probably know that it's a good idea to eat more fiber. But do you know why?

Fiber is found in plant-based foods. It adds volume to your diet, but passes through the intestines quickly because the body can't digest it. That's why fiber can make you feel full faster and prevent constipation. It may also help lower your cholesterol level and reduce your risk for heart disease, obesity and diabetes.

According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, women should get 25 grams of fiber every day and men, 38 grams. Yet only 5 percent of Americans meet this guideline.

With a little effort, you can reach this healthful goal by eating a variety of fiber-rich foods rather than depending on supplements. That's a good idea because you also get the foods' other nutrients -- vitamins, minerals and more.

Vegetables are a major source of fiber, some more than others. These include leafy, raw greens, and cruciferous ones like broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Depending on the veggie, you can enjoy it raw or cooked. Legumes like lentils, dried peas and all manner of beans are other good sources of fiber; many even pack in some protein, making them a great substitution for meat.

Nuts and seeds also add fiber to your diet. Just watch quantities since they're very calorie dense.

Put fresh and dried fruit on your list, too. Apples and pears with the skin are good choices. Also try raisins and prunes.

Hot cereal like oatmeal and cold cereal like bran flakes provide good amounts of fiber. And, of course, don't forget whole wheat bread and pastas, bran muffins, brown rice and even popcorn.

However, ramping up your fiber intake too quickly can cause gas and bloating.

So if you're looking to fill up on fiber, experts say start slow and gradually increase the amount you eat every day.

More information

For more high-fiber foods along with their calories and portion sizes, check out this list from the U.S. Dietary Guidelines.

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=725836

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
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The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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