bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Physicians
Hypertension
Mental Health
 Resources from HONselect
Doctor-Patient Dialogue May Boost Use of Blood Pressure Drugs
Physicians in poor neighborhoods should ask about employment, relationships, study says

By Randy Dotinga

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors can help boost use of high blood pressure medications by their poor patients simply by talking to them, a new study suggests.

Many people fail to take their blood pressure-lowering drugs, putting them at higher risk of heart attack and stroke, the American Heart Association says.

But by communicating more effectively and talking to patients about their specific challenges, physicians may improve medication use, researchers found.

"Health care providers should talk to patients about the things that get in the way of taking their medication, such as relationship status, employment and housing," said Antoinette Schoenthaler, the study's lead author.

"Unemployment, for example, affects whether patients can afford medication, which is a primary risk factor for non-adherence," said Schoenthaler, an associate professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine.

She and her colleagues examined recorded interactions between 92 patients and 27 health care providers at three practices serving a poor New York City population. Blacks, women and the unemployed made up the majority of the patients.

The researchers focused on communication between patients and clinicians, and electronically tracked the patients' pill bottles for three months to see how often the containers were opened.

Patients were three times less likely to take their medications if their doctors didn't ask open-ended questions and make sure they understood instructions, the study found. Open-ended questions often yield more information than yes-no questions.

Also, patients were six times less likely to take their blood pressure drugs when doctors didn't ask about potential challenges such as employment and housing.

The results were published Aug. 22 in the journal Circulation: Quality and Outcomes.

"When health care providers ask patients about life challenges or take the time to check their patient's understanding of instructions, it signals that their health care provider genuinely cares about them and provides the motivation and confidence to manage their health issues on their own," Schoenthaler said in a journal news release.

If important issues go undiscussed, she said, doctors may never figure out why patients are not taking their medications.

More information

For more about blood pressure medications, try the American Heart Association.

SOURCE: Circulation: Quality and Outcomes, Aug. 22, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=725692

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Blood
Specialty Chemicals and Products
Health Personnel
Heart
Physicians
Association
Research Personnel
Risk
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact