bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O S

 
  Other news for:
Back Pain
Child
Parenting
 Resources from HONselect
Take the Back Pain Out of Backpacks
Make sure your child isn't carrying too heavy a load

By Randy Dotinga

SUNDAY, Sept. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Backpacks can mean backaches for schoolchildren, but an orthopedic surgeon has advice for parents and kids about how to keep soreness at bay.

"Parents should inspect their child's backpack from time to time," said Dr. Joshua Hyman of New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital in New York City.

Kids "often carry much more than they should, with extra shoes, toys, electronic devices and other unnecessary items," he explained in a hospital news release.

Hyman suggests that before sending kids off to school, parents should follow these backpack safety tips:

  • Be a weight-watcher. According to Hyman, backpacks shouldn't weigh more than 15 percent of a kid's body weight. That's the equivalent of 7 pounds for a 50-pound child.
  • Lighten the load. If you feel that your child is weighed down by too many textbooks, talk to the teacher about whether any can be left at school. If not, a backpack on wheels may be an option.
  • Two straps are better than one. Encourage your child to wear the straps over both shoulders -- not over one shoulder -- so the weight of the bag is distributed evenly.
  • Size matters. Get a correctly sized backpack that's not wider or longer than your child's torso, and make sure it doesn't hang more than 4 inches below your kid's waist. A low-hanging backpack could force your child to lean forward while walking.
  • The more padding the better. Look for a backpack with straps that are wide and padded to prevent them from digging into the child's shoulders. Also, look for one with a padded back. This can reduce the risk that your child will be hurt by sharp objects inside the backpack.
  • Watch for signs of trouble. Be on the lookout for pain, posture changes, tingling or red marks due to backpack use. If your child's pain is persistent, talk to your pediatrician.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more about backpack safety.

SOURCE: New York-Presbyterian Hospital, news release, Aug. 16, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=725691

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Pain
Back Pain
Back
Parents
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact