bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D

 
  Other news for:
Brain
Craniocerebral Trauma
Headache
Wounds and Injuries
Technology, Medical
 Resources from HONselect
Study Tests Sound Waves to Monitor Pressure Inside the Skull
Noninvasive experiment aims to reduce risk of brain damage, bleeding and infection

By Robert Preidt

TUESDAY, Aug. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A noninvasive method of monitoring pressure inside the skull -- using sound waves -- shows promise, researchers report.

Brain disease or a head injury can cause brain tissue to swell, as well as an increase in the volume of fluid that surrounds and protects the brain. This can cause pressure within the skull to rise, and serious complications and even death can result.

Continuous monitoring lets doctors know if and when they must take steps to lower the pressure.

Currently, to monitor intracranial pressure, a hole is drilled into the skull and sensor-equipped catheters are inserted. This procedure carries risks such as bleeding, infection and damage to brain tissue, but no noninvasive ways to monitor pressure are available, the study authors said.

German researchers tested an experimental noninvasive method on 14 patients and got encouraging results, according to an article published Aug. 8 in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

This approach "uses advanced signal analysis algorithms to evaluate properties of acoustic signals that pass through the brain in order to determine" intracranial pressure, according to a journal news release.

"The first results look promising, but further refinements in the algorithm will be necessary to allow a reliable clinical application," researcher Dr. Oliver Ganslandt said in the news release.

Ganslandt is medical director of the neurosurgery clinic at Klinikum Stuttgart in Germany.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more on increased intracranial pressure.

SOURCE: Journal of Neurosurgery, news release, Aug. 8, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=725210

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Skull
Brain
Wounds and Injuries
Research Personnel
Infection
Tissues
Risk
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Inicio img Sobre nosotros img Rincón de la prensa img Boletín HON img Mapa del sitio img Política ética img Contactos