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Getting Physical With a Personal Trainer
An expert's tips can boost fitness

By Julie Davis
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Sept. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- You might think that hiring a personal trainer is a luxury reserved for the rich. But even just a few sessions can add up to big fitness gains and a great return on investment in yourself, according to the American Council on Exercise.

The role of a personal trainer is to improve your level of physical fitness. He or she will assess your abilities and design a program that includes strength, flexibility and cardio work. Balance, coordination and weight loss might be other goals.

Personalized instruction is especially important for beginners in general and those starting strength training, so that you learn proper form from day one and use the appropriate amount of weight for your current condition.

But regardless of your exercise experience level, you'll get the most out of workouts from a personal trainer because they'll be designed to meet your goals efficiently.

Motivation is another benefit of working with personal trainers. They know how to encourage and challenge you on a regular basis. Also, you'll gain educational insights. A trainer will explain why certain exercises work for your body type and show you how to do them correctly.

If money is tight and you can't afford to work out with a trainer on an ongoing basis, hire a pro on a limited basis, to design or refresh a workout plan for you. Aim for at least three sessions to learn correct form, how much weight to lift and how many minutes of cardio are best.

Make sure the trainer you work with is certified by a leading sports fitness organization, such as the American Council on Exercise or the American College of Sports Medicine.

More information

The American Council on Exercise has more on personal trainers.

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=724940

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Goals
Motivation
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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