bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D

 
  Other news for:
Child Development
Child
Learning Disorders
Parenting
 Resources from HONselect
How Preschoolers Begin Learning the Rules of Reading, Spelling
Exposing them to written words early on will give them a strong start, researcher says

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, Aug. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New research supports the advice that it's never too early to start reading to a child. Children start to recognize and follow some rules of reading and writing as young as age 3, study findings reveal.

The study included 179 U.S. kids aged just over 3 years to about 5.5 years.

"Our results show that children begin to learn about the statistics of written language, for example about which letters often appear together and which letters appear together less often, before they learn how letters represent the sounds of a language," said study co-author Rebecca Treiman. She is a professor of child developmental psychology at Washington University in St. Louis.

An important part of learning to read and spell is discovering how written letters reflect spoken words, Treiman explained in a university news release.

But many people think learning to spell doesn't begin until kids start inventing spellings that reflect the sounds they hear -- for example, C or KL for "climb." Though those early attempts may be flawed, she said they clearly indicate kids are trying to use letters to symbolize what they hear.

"Many studies have examined how children's invented spellings improve as they get older, but no previous studies have asked whether children's spellings improve even before they are able to produce spellings that represent the sounds in words," Treiman said.

"Our study found improvements over this period, with spellings becoming more word-like in appearance over the preschool years in a group of children who did not yet use letters to stand for sounds," she said.

The findings show that exposure to written words when children are 3 to 5 years old may help give them a strong start with their reading, writing and spelling skills, the researchers said.

The study was published recently in the journal Child Development.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders has more about speech and language development.

SOURCE: Washington University in St. Louis, news release, July 25, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=724924

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Learning
Language
Child Development
Research Personnel
Speech
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Inicio img Sobre nosotros img Rincón de la prensa img Boletín HON img Mapa del sitio img Política ética img Contactos