bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Exercise
 Resources from HONselect
Exercise Not Making Dent in Most Seniors' Down Time
Study found it only cut the amount of sedentary time by 12 minutes each day

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, July 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise does little to reduce the amount of time that seniors are sedentary, researchers say.

The new study included more than 1,300 people, average age 79, who wore devices that measured their amount of movement during waking hours. All of them were inactive (such as watching television or being on a computer) for more than 10 hours a day.

Among seniors who were inactive for less than 60 minutes at a time, those who did moderate-intensity exercise -- such as walking, or strength, balance and flexibility training -- were inactive only a maximum of 12 minutes less per day than those who did not exercise, the findings showed.

And, among those whose periods of inactivity lasted an hour or longer at a time, there was no difference between those who exercised and those who did not.

The findings, published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association, surprised the researchers.

"A lot of practitioners have finally accepted the fact that exercise has all these health benefits. Their message is to get out more and move more. And that's a good message. We're not saying you shouldn't do that," said study senior author Todd Manini. He's an associate professor with the University of Florida's department of aging and geriatric research.

"But we have to recognize that going out and exercising doesn't necessarily budge the amount of time people are going to be sedentary in the entire day," Manini said in a university news release. "You are not necessarily taking away from the sedentary bucket and putting it into the exercise bucket."

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about exercise and physical activity.

SOURCE: University of Florida, news release, July 18, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=724706

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Research Personnel
Association
Motor Activity
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact