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When Disaster Strikes, Don't Forget Your Pets
Prepare kit of essential supplies, evacuate early when you have animals, veterinarians say

By Robert Preidt

SUNDAY, July 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People are urged to prepare for disasters by having an emergency plan, and animal experts say that your plan needs to include your pets.

Hurricanes, tornadoes or floods can be unpredictable, and although no one can control the weather, people can control how prepared they are for these threats.

If an evacuation order is given, it is best if you are ready to leave right away, said Angela Clendenin. She is a public information officer for the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences' Veterinary Emergency Team.

"One of the best ways to prepare your pet for a potential disaster is to create a 'go kit' of necessary documents and supplies, which people can easily grab and transport with them in the event of an evacuation," Clendenin said.

"When evacuation is delayed, roads can get jammed with traffic or become impassible with early flooding or debris," Clendenin said in a university news release.

"For those who need assistance with evacuating animals, resources may become scarce or non-existent as the threat from the disaster gets closer," she added. "Evacuating early ensures that pets and their owners are able to get to safety before the disaster hits."

When preparing your emergency kit, be sure to also do so for your pets and livestock. Your pet's emergency kit should include a few days' supply of food, water, medications and comfort items, Clendenin advised.

"In the case that pet and livestock owners get separated, this kit should include photos of pets and descriptions of where livestock is located. Ensuring your pets and livestock are microchipped or visibly tagged or marked is also a way to identify animals and establish ownership," Clendenin explained.

It's also important to protect your pets after the emergency situation has ended, she added.

"After a disaster strikes, the area in and around homes can be quite dangerous for pets," Clendenin said.

Dangers include downed power lines and fencing that has fallen or broken into pieces.

More information

Ready.gov has more about disasters and pets.

SOURCE: Texas A&M University, news release, July 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=724649

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Emergencies
Equipment and Supplies
Veterinarians
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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