bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D

 
  Other news for:
Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent
Diabetes Mellitus, Non-Insulin-Dependent
Foot
 Resources from HONselect
Blame Diabetes: Rates of 2 Nerve Conditions on the Rise
Neurologist says one causes burning pain, the other causes problems with heart rate and blood pressure

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Two particular types of nerve damage -- neuropathy -- have been increasing as more and more people develop diabetes in the United States, an expert says.

Autonomic and small fiber neuropathy were once rare conditions. Both occur when small blood vessels supplying the nerves are damaged by diabetes because they don't get enough oxygen and nutrients, said Dr. Divpreet Kaur, a neurologist at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

Diabetes is one of the main causes of neuropathy, and about 30 million Americans currently have diabetes, Kaur said. More commonly, people with diabetes have nerve damage that causes numbness in the feet and toes. This is called peripheral neuropathy, according to the American Diabetes Association.

Autonomic neuropathy affects involuntary bodily functions such as blood pressure, digestion, sexual function, urination, temperature control and sweat regulation.

"The most common symptom is light-headedness, especially when standing up. The blood pressure drops so much when they stand up that they feel like they are going to pass out," Kaur said in a Penn State news release.

People with small fiber neuropathy often have burning pain in their feet that eventually progresses up their legs. Their hands can also be affected.

"People don't know about it or recognize the symptoms, and they keep going to different physicians without receiving a diagnosis," Kaur said.

"It isn't that every patient who has these symptoms will definitely have such a neuropathy. Once common things have been ruled out by their primary care physician, they can be referred to the neuromuscular clinic for consultation or to the autonomic laboratory for further testing," she said.

There is no cure for either form of neuropathy, and treatment varies depending on the part of the body affected and the symptoms, Kaur said.

Treatment for small fiber neuropathy often involves controlling pain. For autonomic neuropathy, medications can be used to help regulate malfunctioning bodily functions, she said.

Progression of neuropathy associated with diabetes or other underlying conditions can be stabilized or slowed by controlling and treating those conditions. However, an underlying condition can't be identified in nearly one-third of neuropathy patients, the researchers said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more on diabetic neuropathy.

SOURCE: Penn State Health, news release, July 12, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=724585

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Pain
Blood
Therapeutics
Physicians
Dizziness
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Inicio img Sobre nosotros img Rincón de la prensa img Boletín HON img Mapa del sitio img Política ética img Contactos