bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Aging
Alzheimer Disease
Brain
Depression
Hypertension
Urinary Incontinence
Omeprazole
Sleep Disorders
 Resources from HONselect
Popular Heartburn Meds Don't Raise Alzheimer's Risk: Study
New research debunks other studies suggesting that medications used to treat ulcers, reflux cause mental decline

By Randy Dotinga

WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs used to treat acid reflux and ulcers don't appear to boost the risk of dementia, as has been previously suspected, new research suggests.

The study focused on widely used proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) drugs -- medicines such as Prevacid, Prilosec and Nexium. Previous studies have suggested the drugs may increase the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in people aged 75 and older.

PPIs are used to treat digestive problems like reflux disease by reducing the body's production of acid.

Researchers from Emory University in Atlanta analyzed a National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database for the study. The data, compiled from 2005 to 2015, included close to 10,500 Americans, aged 50 or older, with normal brain function or mild thinking difficulties.

Eight percent always used PPIs, and 18 percent sometimes did. Users were older than non-users.

Researchers found those who used PPIs were at a lower risk of a decline in thinking skills.

"The results of this study do not confirm recent reports that the use of PPIs is linked to greater risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease," wrote the researchers led by Felicia Goldstein of the department of neurology at Emory's School of Medicine, in Atlanta.

But those who used PPIs were also more likely to use anticholinergic medicines that have been linked to thinking difficulties. Those medications are used to treat incontinence, depression and sleep problems and include diphenhydramine (Benadryl).

The study found PPI users were more likely to have suffered from heart disease, depression, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke or the mini-strokes known as transient ischemic attacks (TIAs).

The study was published recently in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

More information

For more about proton pump inhibitors, try Harvard Medical School.

SOURCES: American Geriatrics Society, press release, June 22, 2017; Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, May 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=723965

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Risk
Heartburn
Thinking
Research Personnel
Dementia
Specialty Chemicals and Products
Depression
Ulcer
Brain
Sleep
Aged
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact