bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Aging
Alcoholism
Neoplasms
Diabetes Mellitus
Genetics
 Resources from HONselect
Boozing Can Age You Right Down to Your Cells
DNA studies reveal alcoholics have shorter telomeres, key markers of aging and overall health

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The more you booze it up, the more your cells age, increasing your risk for age-related health problems like heart disease, diabetes, cancer and dementia, a new study suggests.

Researchers studied 134 alcoholics between the ages of 41 and 85 and a control group of people in the same age group who weren't alcoholics.

DNA samples revealed that the alcoholics had shortened telomeres.

"Telomeres, the protein caps on the ends of human chromosomes, are markers of aging and overall health," said study leader Dr. Naruhisa Yamaki, a clinical fellow at the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine in Japan.

Every time a cell replicates, a tiny bit of telomere is lost, so they get shorter with age. As time passes, that leaves chromosomes less protected so cells may be unable to function properly. But some people have shorter telomeres for reasons other than aging.

"Our study showed that alcoholic patients have a shortened telomere length, which means that heavy drinking causes biological aging at a cellular level," Yamaki said.

He added that it's important for people to understand that heavy drinking causes telomere shortening, because "awareness of this fact provides important information necessary for people to live healthier."

Yamaki presented the study Sunday at a Research Society on Alcoholism meeting in Denver. Research presented at medical meetings is typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on alcohol and public health.

SOURCE: Research Society on Alcoholism, news release, June 25, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=723898

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Cells
Alcoholism
DNA
Chromosomes
Neoplasms
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact