bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D

 
  Other news for:
Genetics
 Resources from HONselect
Rogue Genes May Cause Some ALS Cases
Most people with Lou Gehrig's disease have no known family history of it

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, June 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Gene mutations may cause up to 17 percent of cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in patients with no family history of the disease, a new study finds.

ALS, often referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a progressive neurological disease that typically leads to complete paralysis and death. There is no cure. It is called familial ALS when there is a clear family history of ALS, and sporadic ALS when there is no known family history.

Up to 90 percent of ALS patients say they have no family history of the disease, according to the study.

"You can't tell familial ALS from sporadic ALS by the symptoms or how the disease develops, but it is also complicated to determine whether a person has inherited the genes for the disease," said Dr. Summer Gibson, of the University of Utah School of Medicine.

"In some families, people may die of other causes before ALS develops, they may be misdiagnosed or in today's small families it's possible that few family members inherit the genes that cause the disease," Gibson explained.

This study included 87 ALS patients with no known family history of the disease and a control group of 324 people without ALS. When researchers looked at each person's genes, they found the ALS patients were more than four times as likely as those in the control group to have rare and likely harmful gene variants -- 17 percent versus 4 percent.

The results were published online June 21 in the journal Neurology.

"Our results highlight that genetic factors play a significant role in the disease, which is important in an era of genetic-focused treatments," Gibson said in a journal news release.

"It is possible that a larger percentage of sporadic ALS cases have a genetic component. It will take more research to discover other possible genetic triggers and to further define possible non-genetic factors that may play a role in causing ALS as well," Gibson concluded.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more on ALS.

SOURCE: Neurology, news release, June 21, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=723829

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Family
Role
Therapeutics
Motor Neuron Disease
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Inicio img Sobre nosotros img Rincón de la prensa img Boletín HON img Mapa del sitio img Política ética img Contactos