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How to Dodge Summertime Threats
Stings, bites, outdoor cooking and even fireworks keep poison control centers hopping

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- During the summer, poison centers get an increase in the number of calls about bites, stings, plants and pesticides.

The Nebraska Regional Poison Center offers these tips on how to avoid poisonings -- and other hazards -- this summer.

"If you are stung, call the poison center. Close observation for allergic reaction is important, especially in the first hour after a sting," the center said in a news release.

Use only insect repellents that are meant to be used on skin. Products containing DEET should be applied sparingly to exposed skin and clothing -- and repellents with less than 10 percent DEET are as effective as stronger ones. Wash thoroughly once you go indoors.

A seasonal threat to kids is exposure to gasoline, kerosene, lighter fluids and torch fuels. These products are among the top 10 causes of childhood poisoning deaths in the United States, according to the poison center. Always store these items out of children's reach.

Food poisoning is another summertime threat. When cooking out or picnicking, keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. Foodsafety.gov has a helpful temperature checklist. Always use a food thermometer to determine if meat is fully cooked, the center advised.

Fireworks also pose a poisoning threat because they contain toxic chemicals. Glow sticks are a common reason for calls to poison centers, but usually cause only minor irritation. If eye exposure occurs, poison center nurses can offer instructions.

Program 800-222-1222 into your phone, and you will be able to reach a poison center anywhere in the United States.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers more poisoning prevention tips.

SOURCE: Nebraska Regional Poison Center, news release

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=723650

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Bites and Stings
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DEET
Hypersensitivity
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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