bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Brain
Craniocerebral Trauma
Headache
 Resources from HONselect
Severe Headaches Plague Vets With Traumatic Brain Injuries
Study finds they can last up to 11 years after initial injury

By Robert Preidt

TUESDAY, June 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. veterans who have suffered traumatic brain injuries may struggle with severe headaches years later, a new study finds.

The study included 172 vets who served in Afghanistan or Iraq between 2 and 11 years before the study began. Half suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) during deployment; half did not.

A TBI is caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head that disrupts normal brain function. Besides headache, it can lead to post-traumatic stress, depression and sleep disorders, as well as problems with thinking and muscle control, the researchers explained.

The researchers assessed the number of vets with the worst headaches, which were described as "disabling" or "severe." A disabling headache was one so bad the veteran stopped all activity and was bedridden. A severe headache meant the vet could do only the most essential tasks; activity decreased by 50 percent to 90 percent.

Disabling or severe headaches were far more common among vets who had suffered a traumatic brain injury. Three out of four had such headaches, compared to one out of four vets without TBI. This difference lasted for up to 11 years.

The study was presented recently at the American Headache Society annual meeting, in Boston.

Dr. Peter Goadsby, chairman of the society's scientific program committee, called the findings "striking." These headaches can take a major toll on the vets' lives and families, he said.

"These new findings fill an important gap in our understanding of TBI -- which many deployed troops experience -- and its impact on headache severity over the long term that can be a key driver of disability for them," he said in a society news release.

Goadsby is a professor of neurology at King's College, London, and the University of California, San Francisco.

"We don't know exactly how TBI causes these severe headaches, but their long-term persistence suggests that processes related to TBI remain active or produce permanent changes in the brain, allowing the headaches to continue," he said. "These and other findings indicate that headaches following TBI will unfortunately continue to be a major problem for many veterans."

More than 330,000 U.S. military personnel have sustained a traumatic brain injury, the researchers noted.

Research presented at medical meetings is typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more on traumatic brain injury.

SOURCE: American Headache Society, news release, June 7, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=723531

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Brain Injuries
Headache
Brain
Wounds and Injuries
Plague
Research Personnel
Veterans
Military Personnel
Lead
Muscles
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact