bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Body Weight Changes
Mental Health
 Resources from HONselect
Women More Likely to Remember Plus-Size Models
It pays to use more realistic body types, small study suggests

By Robert Preidt

TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you're advertising to women, think beyond skinny minnies, a new study suggests.

Young women are more likely to notice and remember average- and plus-size fashion models than thin ones, according to Florida State University researchers.

Seeing plus-size models also gives a boost to many women's mental health, the researchers found.

"We found overwhelmingly that there is a clear psychological advantage when the media shows more realistic body types than the traditional thin model," study co-author Jessica Ridgway said in a university news release. She's an assistant professor in the department of retail, merchandising and product development.

The study included 49 college-age women shown images of thin, average and plus-size fashion models. They also answered questions about their body satisfaction and how much they had compared themselves to the models.

Seeing thin models led the participants to make more social comparisons, pay less attention, remember less about the models, and feel worse about their body, the study found.

But, when they saw average and plus-size models, the participants made fewer social comparisons and paid more attention. They also remembered more about those models, and had higher levels of body satisfaction, according to the researchers.

The study suggests new ways to boost women's health and body satisfaction, the researchers said.

If media producers want to capture attention while also promoting positive body image, it might be useful to employ plus-size models, said lead author Russell Clayton. He's director of the school's Cognition and Emotion Lab.

The study results were published online recently in the journal Communication Monographs.

More information

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has more on media and body image.

SOURCE: Florida State University, news release, June 7, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=723516

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Women
Research Personnel
Personal Satisfaction
Attention
Mental Health
Body Image
Lead
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact