bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Abnormalities
Bites and Stings
Pregnancy Complications
Viruses
 Resources from HONselect
Zika Arrived in Florida at Least Four Different Ways
Virus strains came from the Caribbean and Latin America, researchers say

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The 2016 Zika outbreak in Florida wasn't due to a single introduction and spread of the virus, but rather at least four separate events, researchers report.

By analyzing the genetic material of Zika viruses found in people and mosquitoes in Florida, the scientists also concluded that local transmission of the Zika virus likely began in spring 2016 before the first local case was confirmed.

The researchers said they also discovered that three of the Zika strains that affected Florida spread through the Caribbean islands first before reaching the state. The fourth spread through Central America, the study authors said.

Based on their findings, the researchers believe that a similar Zika transmission pattern could happen again this year in Florida.

There are a number of reasons why Florida is a likely hotspot for Zika outbreaks in the United States, study co-leader Sharon Isern of Florida Gulf Coast University said.

These factors include the climate and an abundance of Zika-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Plus, many people from the Miami area travel to countries where Zika is already established in Latin America and the Caribbean.

While the Zika virus is not harmful to most people, it can cause fevers, rash, headache, joint and muscle pain. It is, however, a significant risk to pregnant women because the virus can cause microcephaly, in which babies are born with underdeveloped heads and brains.

The new study was published May 24 in the journal Nature.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on Zika.

SOURCE: Florida Gulf Coast University, news release, May 24, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=722989

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Research Personnel
Bites and Stings
Sprains and Strains
Fever
Brain
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact