bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

  Many Teens Ride With Impaired Drivers
Passengers not deterred by friends' alcohol or marijuana use, Canadian study finds

By Randy Dotinga

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-third of Canadian high school students admit riding in cars with drivers who've been drinking alcohol.

And almost 20 percent say they've ridden with someone who'd recently used marijuana, a new study reveals.

"These numbers are concerning," said study author Leia Minaker, an assistant professor at Canada's University of Waterloo. "A significant proportion of car-crash deaths are related to alcohol and drug impairment."

The researchers analyzed results of a 2014-15 national survey taken by 24,650 students. Based on the results, they estimate that 9 percent of students in grades 11 and 12 have driven within an hour of drinking, and more than 9 percent have driven after using marijuana.

"The link between alcohol-impaired driving and collision rates is well-recognized, but the consequences of marijuana use are less clear," Minaker said.

Canada wants to legalize marijuana, and Minaker hopes lawmakers take note of these new findings.

"As legislation is drafted to regulate recreational marijuana over the coming months, the federal government and the provinces need to prioritize keeping marijuana away from kids, and creating strong policies to reduce marijuana-impaired driving," she said.

The researchers found kids from rural areas were more likely to drink and drive than those in urban areas.

The researchers also found that boys were more likely than girls to drive after drinking or using marijuana, while girls were more likely to be in cars with drivers who'd been drinking alcohol.

The study was published recently in the Canadian Medical Association Journal Open.

More information

For more about teens and drunk driving, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

SOURCE: University of Waterloo, news release, May 17, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=722832

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Research Personnel
Drive
Association
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact