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Breaking Bad (Eating Habits)
How to change your relationship with food

By Regina Boyle Wheeler
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, June 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Breaking bad eating habits and starting good ones is one of the healthiest steps you can take.

But making healthy choices second nature can take time. After all, it's hard to change a lifetime of bad habits overnight. In fact, research published in the European Journal of Psychology shows it can take anywhere from a couple of weeks to many months for a new habit to feel automatic.

So how do you stay on track until your new healthy-eating plan takes hold?

First, start small. Setting too many goals or too many unrealistic ones can sabotage you right from the start.

Next, set yourself up for success. To break a 3 p.m. candy bar habit, have alternatives ready to grab, like cut-up veggies, low-fat yogurt, and berries. If you work outside the home, bring some healthy, tasty snacks to work with you each day to curb mid-morning and mid-afternoon hunger. Don't leave yourself at the mercy of a vending machine.

Think about why you're snacking. Are you really hungry? Or are you just bored or maybe a little stressed out? Skip the extra calories and take a brisk 5-minute walk instead. And find a friend or co-worker who wants to make healthy changes, too. The buddy system will keep you both on track.

And if you slip up, don't give up. According to the European Journal of Psychology study, little bumps in the road aren't likely to derail the process of creating new habits. So, forgive yourself and get back to your healthy ways as soon as you can. With a little perseverance, those bad habits will soon be gone for good.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more to help you permanently change eating habits and behaviors.

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=722814

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Habits
Psychology
Set (Psychology)
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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