bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Aging
Jogging
Exercise
 Resources from HONselect
Adults Who Love Exercise May Gain 9 'Biological' Years
Regular jogging and other pursuits delay cellular aging, study finds

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Could regular, strenuous exercise be a "fountain of youth"? New research suggests it could be -- for your cells, at least.

"Just because you're 40 doesn't mean you're 40 years old biologically," said Larry Tucker, a professor of exercise science at Brigham Young University in Utah.

"We all know people that seem younger than their actual age. The more physically active we are, the less biological aging takes place in our bodies," Tucker said in a university news release.

He and his colleagues analyzed data from a survey of more than 5,800 Americans. The researchers concluded that people with consistently high levels of physical activity have significantly longer "telomeres" than those who are moderately active or inactive.

Telomeres are the protein endcaps on chromosomes. Each time a cell replicates, a tiny bit of the endcap is lost. That means the older you get, the shorter your telomeres.

But telomeres in adults with high levels of physical activity had seven years less aging than those in moderately active adults. And the advantage was nine years compared with inactive adults, the researchers concluded.

The study authors defined "highly active" as at least 30 minutes (women) or 40 minutes (men) of jogging a day, five days a week.

"If you want to see a real difference in slowing your biological aging, it appears that a little exercise won't cut it. You have to work out regularly at high levels," Tucker said.

The study doesn't actually prove that exercise delays telomere shortening. Still, "we know that regular physical activity helps to reduce mortality and prolong life, and now we know part of that advantage may be due to the preservation of telomeres," Tucker added.

The study is scheduled for publication in the July issue of the journal Preventive Medicine.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute offers a guide to physical activity.

SOURCE: Brigham Young University, news release, May 10, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=722619

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Adult
Love
Motor Activity
Research Personnel
Cells
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact