bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

  Can Experimental Nasal Spray Treat Common Heart Problem?
Drug trial shows promise for treatment of rapid heart rate condition called PSVT

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental nasal spray helped treat a common rapid heart rate condition, researchers report.

The spray, called Etripamil, was tested in patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT). PSVT affects about 500,000 Americans and leads to more than 50,000 hospital visits a year in the United States.

"This study introduces a completely novel therapy that has never been used before, and has the potential to alter how we treat patients with PSVT," said study lead author Dr. Bruce Stambler. He is a cardiac electrophysiologist at Piedmont Heart Institute in Atlanta.

Right now, there is no PSVT treatment that patients can use at home or without medical supervision. They are often treated with adenosine, calcium channel blockers or beta blockers, which must be given intraveneously in a hospital or other monitored setting, the researchers said.

The phase 2 trial included more than 100 patients from the United States and Canada. The researchers said rapid heart rate was controlled within 15 minutes in 87 percent of patients who received a 70-milligram (mg) dose of the nasal spray; 75 percent of patients who got 105 mg; and 95 percent of patients given a 140-mg dose.

That compared to 35 percent of patients who received a placebo.

The most common side effects were temporary nasal congestion or irritation, according to the study, presented Thursday at the Heart Rhythm Society's annual meeting, in Chicago.

"Many patients who suffer from PSVT can experience sudden episodes anytime and anywhere. This fast-acting nasal spray therapy could give patients the convenience to self-administer treatment no matter the location and without having to go to the hospital," Stambler said in a society news release.

Until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal, research presented at meetings should be considered preliminary.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on fast heart rate.

SOURCE: Heart Rhythm Society, news release, May 11, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=722618

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Heart
Therapeutics
Research Personnel
Association
Affect
Lead
Tachycardia
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact