bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Back Pain
Exercise
Wounds and Injuries
Muscular Diseases
Pain
Poisons
 Resources from HONselect
Don't Let Your Garden Get You Down
Yard work relieves stress but can wreak havoc on muscles and joints unless you protect yourself

By Robert Preidt

SATURDAY, May 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Gardening season is here, but it doesn't have to bring a fresh crop of aches, pains and muscle strains.

"While gardening helps to relieve mental stress, many people underestimate the physical stress your body can endure during this activity," orthopedic spine surgeon Dr. Raj Rao said in an American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) news release.

"The constant bending, reaching and squatting involved could result in injuries to the lower back and knees, therefore it's important to be mindful of your body's position while gardening to avoid aches and strains," Rao said.

The AAOS offers a number of safety tips:

  • Before gardening, do some simple stretches to loosen your joints and muscles.
  • Take breaks while you work and avoid staying in the same position for too long.
  • To lift an heavy object, position yourself close to it, separate your feet shoulder-width apart, bend at the knees, tighten your stomach muscles and lift with your leg muscles as you stand up. If an item is too heavy or awkwardly shaped, ask someone to help.
  • Use a garden stool when possible, or consider a vertical garden, wall planters or hanging plant baskets to make work easier.
  • Stay hydrated.
  • Wear gloves, sturdy shoes and long pants to guard against insect bites and injuries.
  • Learn about the plants and trees around you. If you identify poisonous ones, keep young children away and teach them about the potential risks. If you cannot identify a plant or tree, take a sample to your local garden center for identification.
  • Keep gardening equipment in good working order.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on gardening health and safety.

SOURCE: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, news release, May 8, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=722573

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Wounds and Injuries
Muscles
Pain
Joints
Back
Sprains and Strains
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact