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A New Way to Avoid an Embarrassing Male Sexual Problem?
Handy anesthetic 'wipes' may help some -- but not all -- guys with premature ejaculation, small study finds

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, May 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Men troubled by the embarrassment of premature ejaculation might soon have an easy way to avoid it, new research suggests.

Special "wipes" embedded with a mild anesthetic -- benzocaine -- appear to help reduce premature ejaculation, a small new study has found.

According to the American Urological Association (AUA), premature ejaculation is the most common form of male sexual dysfunction, affecting about one in three men aged 18 to 59.

Currently, drug treatments for premature ejaculation in the United States are limited to creams or sprays, the AUA said.

"Premature ejaculation means ejaculation in less than 2 minutes after penetration," explained one urologist, Dr. David Samadi. He's chief of urology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

While benzocaine and other anesthetics have been used before to treat the condition, their use in a bedside wipe is new, he said.

The new study -- funded by the wipes' maker, Veru Healthcare -- included 21 men with premature ejaculation who were in monogamous heterosexual relationships.

Fifteen used the wipes, which contain 4 percent benzocaine, while six others received a placebo wipe with no anesthetic.

After two months, the men in the treatment group showed significant improvement in premature ejaculation compared to those in the placebo group, said a team led by Dr. Ridwan Shabsigh, who specializes in men's sexual health in New York City.

The study was presented May 13 at a meeting of the American Urological Association. Findings presented at medical meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

"This study is encouraging in demonstrating a new and innovative way to reduce the symptoms of premature ejaculation," AUA spokesman Dr. Tobias Kohler said in a meeting news release.

"Premature ejaculation can cause a variety of issues related to negative feelings and emotions that can lead to problems with sexual relationships. This data shows topical 4 percent benzocaine wipes is a promising therapy to treat the most common form of sexual dysfunction among men," he said.

Kohler is associate professor and residency program director at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine.

But Samadi brought up one potential downside: benzocaine's effect on the man's sex partner.

"The study has not mentioned a common problem of using topical anesthetics, which is absence of an orgasm in the female partner," Samadi said. "Topical anesthetics can be absorbed through the vaginal wall and reduce the partner sensation if a condom is not used."

Dr. Harris Nagler is a urologist at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y. He reviewed the study and agreed that the wipes are a "novel technique for application of topical anesthetic to decrease penile sensitivity and premature ejaculation."

But he added that the study was small and was also too vague about a number of factors, such as a "lack of consistency of measurement of time to ejaculation."

And Nagler said topical anesthetics won't help every man battling premature ejaculation.

That's because the treatment has "also resulted in erectile dysfunction in some men due to penile numbness, and vaginal insensitivity -- affecting partner satisfaction," Nagler said.

"However, it is reasonable to assume that there would be men who would benefit by this novel approach," he said.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more on premature ejaculation.

SOURCES: Harris M. Nagler, M.D., urologist, Northwell Health's Arthur Smith Institute of Urology at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, N.Y.; David Samadi, M.D., chairman of urology, chief of robotic surgery, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; American Urological Association, news release, May 13, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=722560

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
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