bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D

 
  Other news for:
Brain
 Resources from HONselect
Science Uncovers a True Meeting of the Minds
When students are engaged in a classroom, their brainwaves sync up, new research finds

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, April 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Students' brainwaves sync up and show similar patterns when they pay attention in class, according to a new study.

Researchers used portable devices to simultaneously record brain activity of a class of high school students as they did regular classroom activities. The study spanned a full semester.

"We found that students' brainwaves were more in sync with each other when they were more engaged during class," said co-lead author Suzanne Dikker, a research scientist at New York University and Utrecht University in the Netherlands.

"Brain-to-brain synchrony also reflected how much students liked the teacher and how much they liked each other. Brain synchrony was also affected by face-to-face social interaction and students' personalities. We think that all these effects can be explained by shared attention mechanisms during dynamic group interactions," she said.

The findings were published April 27 in the journal Current Biology.

The level of brain synchrony probably owes to something called neural entrainment, the researchers said.

"Your brainwaves 'ride' on top of the sound waves or light patterns in the outside world, and the more you pay attention to these temporal patterns, the more your brain locks to those patterns," Dikker said in a journal news release.

If people in a group are more engaged, their brainwaves will be similar, because they are locked onto the same information, she explained.

Researchers now plan large-scale studies in which they'll record brain activity and other data from up to 45 people at a time in an auditorium.

They hope to answer questions such as: What conditions are best for an audience to experience a performance or movie? Is there an ideal group size? Does interaction before a performance improve the experience? How do the audience and the performer affect each other?

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more on the brain.

SOURCE: Current Biology, news release, April 27, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=721991

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Brain
Research Personnel
Attention
Mental Health
Affect
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Inicio img Sobre nosotros img Rincón de la prensa img Boletín HON img Mapa del sitio img Política ética img Contactos