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De-Stressing at Lunch
Take time to nourish your soul, as well

By Joan McClusky
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, May 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For a lot of people, stress is a built-in part of the workday.

Lunchtime offers a valuable break, and time to relax and unwind. But if you're forcing yourself to socialize at lunch, you may be robbing yourself of the downtime you need.

When it comes to reducing stress and fatigue at work, research has shown that it's important to feel you're in control of how you spend your lunchtime and who you spend it with.

So, if you're sharing a pizza with co-workers because that's what you want to do, you'll be giving yourself a much-needed break. But if you feel pressured into eating with co-workers or your boss, it can feel like it's just more work.

In fact, it can be less stressful to eat in your cubicle, if that's what you want to do. Researchers have found that people who spend their lunchtime doing something relaxing that they've chosen to do have the least fatigue at the end of the day.

But even working through lunch can reduce stress and fatigue if people feel they've made the choice to do so. One tip: Making healthy food choices at lunchtime will give you a physical boost, too.

The bottom line? Whenever possible, spend lunchtime doing what you want.

More information

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has food safety tips for eating at the office.

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=721738

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Fatigue
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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