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Black Americans' Cancer Rates Differ by Birthplace
Researchers spot distinctions between African-born immigrants and blacks born in U.S.

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer rates differ between African- and U.S.-born black Americans, a new study finds.

"Typically, cancer occurrence among blacks in the United States is presented as one homogenous group, with no breakdown by country or region of birth," said study co-author Dr. Ahmedin Jemal, an American Cancer Society epidemiologist.

"Our study shows that approach masks important potential differences that may be key to guiding cancer prevention programs for African-born black immigrants," Jemal added.

The researchers analyzed 2000-2012 U.S. data to compare rates of the top 15 cancers in African-born blacks to U.S.-born blacks.

Blacks born in sub-Sahara Africa had much higher rates of infection-related cancers (liver, stomach and Kaposi sarcoma) than U.S.-born blacks. They also had higher rates of blood cancers (leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma), prostate cancer and thyroid cancers (in females only).

For example, the rate of Kaposi sarcoma was 12 times higher in African-born black women than U.S.-born black women, the researchers found. Kaposi sarcoma is a cancer that causes lesions in soft tissues.

However, the lung cancer rate for African-born black men was 30 times lower than for U.S.-born blacks. African-born men also had lower colon cancer rates.

The researchers also found that cancer rates varied by region of birth in Africa. For example, higher rates of liver cancer among males and of thyroid cancer in females were confined to those born in eastern Africa, while the higher rate of prostate cancer among men was limited to those born in western Africa.

The study was published online April 13 in the journal Cancer.

Environmental, cultural, social and genetic factors may explain the differences in cancer rates between African- and U.S.-born blacks. Learning more about such influences could lead to targeted cancer prevention programs, Jemal and his colleagues said in a journal news release.

Blacks from sub-Sahara Africa are among the fastest-growing populations in the United States. They accounted for a large proportion of the estimated 2.1 million black African immigrants in the United States in 2015, according to notes with the study.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention outlines strategies for cancer prevention.

SOURCE: Cancer, news release, April 13, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=721539

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Neoplasms
Research Personnel
Sarcoma, Kaposi
Men
Sarcoma
Prostatic Neoplasms
Thyroid Gland
Liver
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
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