bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D

 
  Other news for:
Autistic Disorder
Parenting
Travel
 Resources from HONselect
1 in 3 Teens With Autism Licensed to Drive, Study Finds
Pediatricians suggest discussing adolescent's capabilities with doctor first

By Robert Preidt

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many teens with autism want to hit the open road on their own, and new research shows that about one-third are following through on those dreams and getting a driver's license.

"We know that driving can increase mobility and independence for adolescents with ASD [autism spectrum disorder], but little was known about their rates of licensure," said study principal investigator Allison Curry. She's a senior scientist at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's Center for Injury Research and Prevention.

"Our results indicate that a substantial proportion of adolescents with ASD do get licensed, and support is needed to help families make the decision whether or not to drive before these adolescents become eligible for a learner's permit," she added in a hospital news release.

For the study, researchers reviewed data on New Jersey teens. The investigators found that one in three teens with autism but no intellectual disability obtained an intermediate driver's license. Most did so when they were 17 years old.

Nearly 82 percent of teens with autism who obtained a learner's permit received their intermediate license within one year. For teens without autism, the rate was 94 percent. Within 24 months of getting a permit, the rates were nearly 90 percent for kids with autism and 98 percent for those without the disorder.

An intermediate license permits drivers to travel with restrictions. These rules vary by state, but usually include driving curfews and regulations on the age and number of passengers.

"For teens on the autism spectrum, the decision to pursue a driver's license is one of several milestones that other families might take for granted," study co-author Benjamin Yerys said. He's a scientist at the hospital's Center for Autism Research.

"Independent means of transportation contributes to other long-term opportunities, such as post-high school education or employment, and being socially involved and connected within their community," he said.

But Yerys pointed out that "ASD can affect decision-making, information processing and attention to varying degrees."

Yerys said experts need to understand what resources, specialized instruction, and other support might help teens with ASD who want to drive.

Study co-author Dr. Patty Huang suggested that parents of teens with autism spectrum disorders should talk to their child's doctor about any concerns, such as attention issues, that might interfere with driving ability. She's a developmental and behavioral pediatrician at the Philadelphia hopsital.

"Parents may also want to seek the advice of an occupational therapist who specializes in driving or a driving educator who has training in working with individuals with special needs," she added.

The study was published April 11 in the journal Autism.

More information

Learn more about autism and driving from the Modern Driver Institute.

SOURCE: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, news release, April 11, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=721363

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Autistic Disorder
Drive
Research Personnel
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive
Parents
Family
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Inicio img Sobre nosotros img Rincón de la prensa img Boletín HON img Mapa del sitio img Política ética img Contactos