bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D

 
  Other news for:
Neoplasms
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Skin Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Liver
Surgery
 Resources from HONselect
Surgery May Be Best for Advanced Melanoma
Patients who had lesions reaching the belly removed lived about 18 months longer, study says

By Mary Elizabeth Dallas

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery to remove melanoma -- the deadliest form of skin cancer -- can extend the lives of patients whose disease has spread to the abdomen area, new research suggests.

Patients who get drug therapy and surgery to remove their cancer live twice as long -- 18 months on average -- as those who only get medication, researchers found.

"Now that there are better options systemically, the decision-making about treatment has become more complex. Having this data available could potentially impact discussions about treatment and benefit patients long-term," said study leader Dr. Gary Deutsch, a cancer surgeon at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y.

"I think the combination of immunotherapy with surgical therapy ... could potentially lead to curing more patients," he said in a health system news release.

Immunotherapy prompts a patient's immune system to destroy cancer cells. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved it to treat melanoma, providing an alternative to standard chemotherapy for cancers that spread to other parts of the body. The researchers behind the new study said surgery to remove melanoma that has spread within the belly is rare.

For the study, Deutsch and his team analyzed the medical records of more than 1,600 patients treated for melanoma that had spread to the abdominal area. Of those, nearly 400 had surgery to remove their cancer.

Melanoma had spread to the liver in 697 patients, to the gastrointestinal tract in 336 patients and to the adrenal glands in 138 patients. It spread to the spleen in 109 patients and to the pancreas in 38. Another 305 patients' cancer spread to several organs.

For patients who had surgery to remove their melanoma, the average survival time was 18 months, nearly 2.5 times longer than those who didn't have surgery.

The study was published April 5 in the journal JAMA Surgery.

Deutsch said he believes integrating surgery with newer drug treatments will greatly benefit patients.

Deutsch did the research as a surgical oncology fellow at the John Wayne Cancer Institute at Providence Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif.

More information

The American Cancer Society provides more information on melanoma.

SOURCE: Northwell Health, news release, April 5, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=721298

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Melanoma
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Drug Therapy
Liver
Research Personnel
Skin Neoplasms
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Inicio img Sobre nosotros img Rincón de la prensa img Boletín HON img Mapa del sitio img Política ética img Contactos