bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Abnormalities
Labor
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System
Mental Health
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
 Resources from HONselect
Health Risks Grow as Young People Born With HIV Age
About 10,000 Americans were infected at birth, and many are now young adults with medical issues, study finds

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Teens and young adults who were infected with HIV near the time of birth are at increased risk for serious health problems and death, a new study finds.

"Despite being engaged in health care, the number of deaths among youth born with HIV in the U.S. is 6 to 12 times higher than for youth without HIV of the same age, sex and race," said study leader Dr. Anne Neilan. She is an infectious disease fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

Neilan and her hospital colleagues analyzed 2007-2015 data from more than 1,400 young Americans who were infected with HIV -- the virus that causes AIDS -- when they were born.

Those between the ages of 13 and 30 were more likely to have what doctors call poor HIV control. That means they had higher levels of the virus and lower levels of the immune cells that HIV targets. They also were more likely to have AIDS-related illnesses and die.

Of those between 18 and 30 years of age, 35 percent had poor HIV control. That makes them more likely to become resistant to some HIV medications and transmit HIV to others.

"Adolescents infected with HIV -- either at birth or later in life -- experience poorer health outcomes compared to adults with HIV in nearly every respect," Neilan said in a hospital news release. "The good news is that among those with good HIV control, serious health problems are rare."

Along with HIV-related health issues, the most commonly reported problems among patients in the study were mental health disorders and nervous system development. Many women also had sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), possibly related to a weakened immune system.

"This may suggest a biological mechanism for increased STDs or may reflect that patients who have difficulty with their medications are also engaging in more frequent risky sexual behaviors," study senior author Dr. Andrea Ciaranello said in the news release. Ciaranello practices in the Division of Infectious Disease at Mass General.

The study was published online March 27 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

About 10,000 young people in the United States were infected with HIV at birth, and most are now over age 18. Due to the use of antiretroviral therapy, fewer than 200 U.S. babies a year are born with HIV now, the researchers said.

But better care is needed for young people who have HIV, Neilan said. "That might include youth-friendly services that consider the substantial stigma many of these patients face, novel approaches to antiretroviral therapy delivery, and improving support for youth transitioning from pediatric to adult health care providers," she said.

More information

AIDSinfo.nih.gov has more on mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

SOURCE: Massachusetts General Hospital, news release, March 27, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=721074

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Risk
Adult
Mental Health
Communicable Diseases
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Nervous System
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact