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Breast Feeding
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Breast-Feeding Success Hinges on Support for Mom, Baby
Limiting visitors early on and relying on the help of a lactation expert can get mothers off to a good start

By HealthDay staff

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Information and support can help new mothers overcome breast-feeding difficulties, a lactation expert says.

A pregnant woman should tell her partner and family about her breast-feeding goals and why they're important to her, said Dr. Nicole Hackman. She's a pediatrician and medical director for lactation services at Penn State Children's Hospital, in Hershey.

New mothers "will need to rely on that support during the challenging days," she said in a hospital news release.

It's important for the mother and baby to have skin-to-skin contact for the first hour after birth, she said.

"Not only does that regulate the baby's heart rate, temperature and glucose level, but it can help the baby latch on and have the first breast-feeding session," Hackman said.

She said it's also a good idea to limit visitors during a baby's first week of life. That gives mother and baby private time to bond and learn to breast-feed. It also gives mom a chance to rest when her baby sleeps.

During that first week, a new mother should try to breast-feed whenever the baby is awake, Hackman said.

"Because breast milk volume is all about supply and demand, the more demand a baby puts on mom, the more her supply will increase," she explained.

Though some mothers prefer to pump breast milk, their babies can still reap the benefits of mother's milk. It contains antibodies that help babies fight off germs, Hackman said.

Lactation consultants can help mothers achieve pain-free breast-feeding.

"There may be initial discomfort, but something isn't right if there is pain throughout the feeding session," Hackman said. "Nipple pain is not normal."

She added that babies who have been given a bottle or pacifier sometimes need to be retaught to latch comfortably at the breast.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on breast-feeding.

SOURCE: Penn State Children's Hospital, news release, March 15, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=720763

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
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The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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