bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Hematologic Diseases
Lung Neoplasms
Neoplasms
 Resources from HONselect
Blood Test May Spot Lung Cancer's Return, Even Before Scans
Small study finds the new technique beats CT and PET scans by around 6 months

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, March 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A blood test can detect the return of lung cancer months before CT and PET scans, a new study suggests.

The research included 48 adults with stage 2 or 3 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The patients were aged 31 to 84. All were treated with chemotherapy and radiation.

Blood samples were taken before treatment, during treatment, and at six different times during the two years following treatment. The blood samples were checked for increased levels of circulating tumor cells, the researchers said.

The blood tests were able to detect lung cancer recurrence an average of six months before CT and PET scans, the investigators found.

The study was presented March 16 at a meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, in San Francisco. Research presented at meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

"The additional lead time afforded by an earlier diagnosis may enable doctors to better tailor alternative and salvage treatments to improve their patients' outcomes and quality of life," said lead author Chimbu Chinniah. He is a research fellow in radiation oncology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia.

"Earlier detection of recurrence may even translate into an increased likelihood of curing these patients when their tumor burden is lowest and thus more likely to respond to therapy," Chinniah suggested in a society news release.

According to the study's senior author, Dr. Charles Simone II, "The future use of circulating tumor cells as a diagnostic and prognostic tool for localized NSCLC looks promising."

Simone said that imaging tests -- such as CT and PET scans -- will remain "the cornerstone of post-treatment surveillance."

But blood tests could be used together with imaging scans. This combination might be a better way to monitor patients after treatment, he added. Simone is an associate professor of radiation oncology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, in Baltimore.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on lung cancer.

SOURCE: American Society for Radiation Oncology, news release, March 16, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=720746

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Blood
Lung
Hematologic Tests
Therapeutics
Cells
Lead
Research Personnel
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact