bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Neoplasms
 Resources from HONselect
Social Struggles Linger for Many Young Cancer Survivors
Challenges persist up to 2 years after diagnosis, study finds

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, March 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many teen and young adult cancer survivors face social struggles, a new study finds.

Researchers surveyed more than 140 U.S. cancer patients who were 14 to 39 years old at the time of diagnosis. Patients answered questions when they learned they had cancer and again one and two years later.

At all three time points, the cancer patients had worse social functioning than people in the general population. Although slight improvements were noted over the first year after diagnosis, social prowess remained much lower than in the general population two years after diagnosis, the researchers found.

"Reducing physical symptoms and psychological distress and enhancing social support by interventions in the period after treatment may potentially help these young survivors to better reintegrate into society," said study author Olga Husson. She's a postdoctoral research fellow at Radboud University Medical Center in The Netherlands.

The study results were published online March 20 in the journal Cancer.

One-third of the participants had consistently low social functioning throughout the entire study period. These patients were more likely to have stopped receiving treatment, meaning they were coping with the challenges of switching from cancer patient to survivor.

That may have meant they were dealing with concerns about finances, body image, work goals, relationships and plans for having children, according to the researchers.

Patients with consistently low social functioning also had more physical symptoms and higher levels of mental distress. They reported receiving less social support, too, Husson and her colleagues said in a journal news release.

While the study finds a link between cancer survival and social struggles, it doesn't establish a direct cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on cancer survivorship.

SOURCE: Cancer, news release, March 20, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=720724

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Neoplasms
Survivors
Diagnosis
Research Personnel
Therapeutics
Adult
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact