bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Pregnancy Complications
 Resources from HONselect
Most Women Stop Drinking After Positive Pregnancy Test, Study Finds
Researchers 'pleasantly surprised' by fact that most quickly made the healthy choice

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When they learn they're pregnant, most American women stop drinking alcohol, a new study shows.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 5,000 newly pregnant women in eight U.S. cities. They found that the vast majority stopped or reduced their drinking after their positive pregnancy test.

"Our study was not focused on whether or not alcohol is safe in the early conception window," said study senior author Dr. Katherine Hartmann.

"We wanted to see what actual women were currently doing. And we were pleasantly surprised about how promptly people changed their alcohol use," said Hartmann, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn.

Most quit completely, while about 6 percent of women continued to consume some alcohol, almost all of them at very low levels, she said.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that women who are pregnant or could become pregnant avoid alcohol use.

The fact that many women understand the risks of alcohol use during pregnancy and change their drinking habits is encouraging, but doing so is most effective the earlier women know they're pregnant, Hartmann added.

"Women were already self-regulating their alcohol use. Our findings suggested that promoting early pregnancy awareness could prove to be more effective than promoting abstinence from alcohol among all who could conceive," she said in a university news release.

The study will appear in the April issue of the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism has more about alcohol and pregnancy.

SOURCE: Vanderbilt University, news release, March 9, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=720467

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Women
Pregnancy Tests
Alcoholism
Research Personnel
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact