bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Asthma
Emergencies
First Aid
Respiration Disorders
 Resources from HONselect
Asthma Much More Lethal for Black Children, Study Finds
This group has 6 times the odds of dying from the illness compared to whites, Hispanics

By Robert Preidt

SATURDAY, March 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma attacks can prove deadly to kids, but a new study shows that black American children are six times more likely to die of the illness than their white or Hispanic peers.

The gap in death rates "may imply a differential access to care" based on a family's race, said lead author Dr. Anna Chen Arroyo, in a news release from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. She is from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

Arroyo was slated to present the findings Saturday at the academy's annual meeting in Atlanta.

There is no cure for asthma, and it can be deadly if not properly controlled through proper diagnosis, medication and a management plan, the authors noted.

One respiratory specialist agreed, and said kids everywhere are affected.

"Asthma is a chronic condition which affects approximately 9 million children in the United States," said Dr. Sherry Farzan, who specializes in allergy and immunology at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y.

"There is a wide range of symptoms and degrees of severity," she added, "with some children having intermittent symptoms, whereas others have chronic daily symptoms with recurrent exacerbations and hospitalizations."

Families can help control a child's asthma through regular access to health care professionals, making sure kids stick with their meds, and cutting down on allergens in the home, Farzan said.

But do all American families have equal access to these measures?

In the new study, Arroyo's team tracked data regarding the asthma deaths of almost 2,600 children nationwide between 2003 and 2014.

The researchers found that just over 50 percent of all the deaths among children with asthma occurred in emergency departments or clinics rather than at home (14 percent) or in a hospital (30 percent).

And in all these locations, black children were more likely to die than any other group of children, the study found.

According to Farzan, this suggests that "health care disparities affect the most vulnerable in our society."

"Further studies must be undertaken to determine which aspects contributing to poor control play a role in this population of patients," she said. "This can inform national measures to help improve the components of asthma control among black children."

Dr. Craig Osleeb is a pediatric allergist at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y. He said that while certain genetic or environmental factors might play a role in the higher death risk to black children, "this study may [also] suggest discrepancies in access to care."

These findings were presented at a medical meeting, and they should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more on asthma.

SOURCES: Sherry Farzan, M.D., attending physician, Allergy and Immunology, Northwell Health, Great Neck, N.Y.; Craig Osleeb, M.D., pediatric allergist and immunologist, Northern Westchester Hospital, Mount Kisco, N.Y.; American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, news release, March 4, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=720285

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Asthma
Hypersensitivity
Family
Affect
Role
Death
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact