bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D

 
  Other news for:
Cosmetics
Skin Care
Skin Diseases
 Resources from HONselect
Don't Believe Everything You Read on Skin-Care Product Labels
Terms like 'hypoallergenic' and 'fragrance-free' may not mean what you think they do, doctor says

By Mary Elizabeth Dallas

FRIDAY, March 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Some terms on skin-care product labels may mislead consumers, so people can't always rely on what they read on the package, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

"The language on the label is not always an accurate description of the product inside the bottle or its potential effects on your skin," Dr. Rajani Katta said in an academy news release. Katta is a clinical assistant professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

"Manufacturers may use certain language for marketing purposes, and the same terms may mean different things on different products -- and that makes it difficult to determine what they mean for our skin," Katta explained.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not regulate descriptions on skin-care product labels. That means terms such as "for sensitive skin" or "hypoallergenic" are no guarantee that a product will not irritate or cause an allergic reaction, she added.

Products described as "all-natural" aren't necessarily good either. "Remember, poison ivy is 'all-natural.' And even if a natural ingredient is good for your skin, some products may combine that ingredient with additives or preservatives that could be harmful," Katta warned.

In addition, products described as "fragrance-free" may legally contain fragrance chemicals -- as long as they are being used for a purpose other than scent. The term "unscented" also doesn't indicate that a product is fragrance-free. It can describe products that use fragrance chemicals to mask other strong smells, Katta explained.

"Unfortunately, there isn't any labeling language that guarantees a product is hypoallergenic and suitable for sensitive skin," she said.

Complicating matters, reactions to skin-care products may not be noticeable right away, Katta noted. Some people develop an allergy even after using a product for months or years.

To help prevent skin reactions, Katta offered these tips:

  • Before using a new product, test a small amount on your forearm for a week to see if it triggers a reaction.
  • Read and follow all product directions.
  • Avoid new products while your skin is irritated or inflamed.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about personal-product labels.

SOURCE: American Academy of Dermatology, news release, March 3, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=720048

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Language
Hypersensitivity
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Inicio img Sobre nosotros img Rincón de la prensa img Boletín HON img Mapa del sitio img Política ética img Contactos