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Kids Should Be Screened for Lazy Eye by Age 5
Waiting later could lead to permanent vision problems, U.S. panel says

By Randy Dotinga

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young children should be screened at least once for lazy eye before they turn 5 years old, a U.S. panel of experts says.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task (USPSTF) is still advising parents to have their kids screened at least once for lazy eye or its risk factors. Screening should be done when the children are between the ages of 3 and 5 years old. These draft guidelines are an update to 2011 recommendations.

Early identification of lazy eye -- technically called amblyopia -- is critical. If the condition isn't treated by the time a child is between the ages of 6 and 10 years, vision can be permanently affected, the experts said.

With lazy eye, the brain and one eye don't communicate properly. Symptoms may include a wandering eye, eyes that don't seem to work together, or poor depth perception, the experts explained.

It's estimated that up to 6 percent of children of preschool age have lazy eye or conditions that increase the risk of it. The other conditions include crossed eyes and the eyes that don't focus together properly.

"Identification of vision abnormalities in preschool-aged children allows the abnormality to be corrected while the brain is still developing, which can prevent permanent vision loss," task force member Dr. Alex Kemper said in a task force news release. Kemper is with Duke University Medical School in Durham, N.C.

The task force said there's not enough research to know whether screening should be done before age 3.

The public can comment on the task force's draft recommendations until March 27 by visiting www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org.

More information

For more about lazy eye, visit the U.S. National Eye Institute.

SOURCE: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, press release, Feb. 28, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=719999

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Eye
Amblyopia
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Identification (Psychology)
Mass Screening
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The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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