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Head Position Just After Stroke Doesn't Affect Recovery: Study
Lying flat or sitting up slightly neither boosted nor harmed patients' outcomes

By Alan Mozes

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The way a patient's head is positioned by health care professionals right after a stroke doesn't seem to have any bearing on how well he or she will fare, new research indicates.

The finding stems from an analysis of more than 11,000 patients from 114 hospitals in nine countries.

The researchers set out to assess whether having a patient lie flat following a stroke caused by a clot might improve or harm recovery over the ensuing three months.

The investigators also looked at the potential impact of having a patient sit up at a 30-degree (or higher) angle right after being hospitalized for a bleeding stroke.

Most of the study patients had suffered a stroke resulting from a clot in the brain (ischemic stroke), and 60 percent of the patients were men, with an average age of 68.

The research was sparked by the notion that lying flat after suffering an ischemic stroke would increase blood flow to the brain, which in turn might have a beneficial impact. That theory was not borne out by the analysis, the study authors said.

The other possibility was that a reduction in swelling prompted by having patients sit up after suffering a large, hemorrhagic stroke (involving bleeding in the brain) might boost recovery. But that was not the case, the researchers said.

At the same time, neither position seemed to impede recovery, according to the report.

The investigation was led by Dr. Craig Anderson of the George Institute of Global Health in Sydney, Australia. He and his colleagues were scheduled to present their findings Wednesday at the International Stroke Conference in Houston.

Research presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

There's more on stroke treatment at the American Stroke Association.

SOURCE: American Stroke Association International Stroke Conference, news release, Feb. 22, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=719937

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Head
Affect
Brain
Research Personnel
Association
Stress, Psychological
Deception
Hemorrhage
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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