bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Hormones
Child
Love
Parenting
 Resources from HONselect
'Love Hormone' Helps Dads and Babies Bond
Brain scans show distinct response when fathers gaze at their kids

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The "love hormone" oxytocin may program fathers to bond with their young children, a new study suggests.

"Our findings add to the evidence that fathers, and not just mothers, undergo hormonal changes that are likely to facilitate increased empathy and motivation to care for their children," said study lead author James Rilling of Emory University in Atlanta.

Oxytocin is a naturally occurring hormone. MRI brain scans revealed that dads who received boosts of the hormone through a nasal spray had increased activity in brain areas associated with reward and empathy when looking at pictures of their toddlers, Rilling's team said.

The findings also "suggest that oxytocin, known to play a role in social bonding, might someday be used to normalize deficits in paternal motivation, such as in men suffering from post-partum depression," Rilling said in a university news release.

Rilling is an anthropologist and director of the Laboratory for Darwinian Neuroscience.

There's growing evidence that fathers' involvement with their children reduces a child's risk of illness and death. It also helps children's social, mental and educational development, the researchers said in background notes.

However, not all fathers take a "hands-on" approach to caring for their children, Rilling said.

"I'm interested in understanding why some fathers are more involved in caregiving than others," he said. "In order to fully understand variation in caregiving behavior, we need a clear picture of the neurobiology and neural mechanisms that support the behavior."

The study was published online Feb. 17 in the journal Hormones and Behavior.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on parenting.

SOURCE: Emory University, news release, Feb. 17, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=719709

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Hormones
Love
Fathers
Brain
Empathy
Behavior
Motivation
Parenting
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact