bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Emergencies
First Aid
Food
 Resources from HONselect
Hey, Super Bowl Fans: Don't Choke on Game Day
Be especially careful with meats as these foods are most likely to get stuck, study finds

By Robert Preidt

SATURDAY, Feb. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Be careful when you shovel down those chicken wings as you watch the Super Bowl on Sunday -- a new study finds that if you overeat your favorite team isn't the only one who might choke.

Americans who overeat during national sporting events or holidays are 10 times more likely to require emergency care for food obstruction than at other times of the year, according to a new study.

Researchers reviewed 11 years of data (2001-2012) from the emergency room at St. Elizabeth's Medical Center in Boston. During that time, 38 people had an emergency procedure on the esophagus during or within three days of a national sporting event or holiday. Nearly 37 percent of those procedures were due to so-called food impaction.

The researchers also looked at 81 people who had the same procedure two weeks before or two weeks after a holiday or major sporting event. Just under 4 percent of those cases were due to food impaction, the research showed.

"Though the sample size was small, it's clear that a pattern emerged showing a higher percentage of people seeking treatment during or just after the holiday or event, and a much greater percentage during those times needed help because food was impacted in their esophagus," said study leader Dr. Asim Shuja, a gastroenterologist from University of Florida Health in Jacksonville.

"It's a very serious problem that people need to be aware of," he said in a university news release.

During holidays and national sporting events, meats seem to create the biggest risk. The most common impacted food was turkey (50 percent), followed by chicken (29 percent) and beef (21 percent), the study found.

Men were most likely to be affected, researchers said.

Other risk factors included serving size, how quickly people ate and alcohol consumption, according to the study.

"We think the main message here is for people to be aware and not to, for lack of a better term, overindulge. Not only the amount of food you're eating during the holiday or event, but the size of the portion you're eating can have a tremendous impact," Shuja said.

The study was published in the journal Gastroenterology Report.

More information

The National Safety Council offers choking prevention and rescue tips.

SOURCE: University of Florida, news release, Feb. 2, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=719337

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Emergencies
Research Personnel
Methods
Risk
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact