bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Infection
 Resources from HONselect
Common Viruses a Deadly Threat at Nursing Homes
RSV and human metapneumovirus need to be taken as seriously as influenza, study author says

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Common viruses pose a serious threat in nursing homes, often sabotaging standard infection control measures, a new case study suggests.

"Long-term care facilities have unique challenges. Infection-control policies from acute care hospitals cannot simply be mirrored in this setting and expected to work," said study lead author Dr. Schaefer Spires.

His report details a 16-day outbreak of two viruses -- respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) -- that swept through a long-term dementia ward in Tennessee. Nearly three-quarters of the patients became sick and five died.

"RSV and HMPV are viruses that need to be taken as seriously as we take the flu, especially in older adults," said Spires, an assistant professor of infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville.

RSV causes infections of the lungs and respiratory tract. HMPV is a cold virus.

According to the report, 30 of 41 patients contracted at least one of the viruses and 15 were hospitalized.

The outbreak led the facility to implement new protocols for protecting these vulnerable patients. These included active screening; more efficient separation of ill and healthy residents during cold and flu season; improved hand hygiene; use of personal protective equipment by staff; and faster respiratory viral testing.

But many of the health care providers also became sick, hindering efforts to separate the sick from the healthy, the report said.

Also, dementia prevented many patients from reporting their symptoms, which delayed identification of new cases, Spires said.

The study was published Jan. 9 in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

"Early detection of a contagious pathogen and identification of infected patients is important when trying to prevent an outbreak. However, once a certain number of residents were infected, we had almost no chance at preventing further cases from developing," Spires said in a journal news release.

Thanks to better technology, viruses other than influenza can be detected on a more routine basis. As a result, "we are recognizing the importance of RSV, HMPV, and other viruses in causing [illness] in the older adult population," he added.

"There is a clear need for vaccines and new antivirals to aid our efforts in prevention of these viral infections," Spires said.

More information

The American Lung Association has more on respiratory syncytial virus.

SOURCE: Infection Control &Aamp; Hospital Epidemiology, news release, Jan. 9, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=718556

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Infection
Adult
Identification (Psychology)
Dementia
Lung
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact