bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Diabetes Mellitus
 Resources from HONselect
Chemo More Damaging to Hearts of Diabetics: Study
Those with blood sugar disease showed more early warning signs of heart failure

By Randy Dotinga

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A small study finds that cancer patients who have diabetes may suffer worse heart damage from chemotherapy, potentially boosting their risk of heart failure.

There are increasing reports of toxic effects to the heart -- also known as cardiotoxicity -- due to chemotherapy with drugs known as anthracyclines, said study lead author Dr. Ana Catarina Gomes. Such drugs include doxorubicin (Doxil) and epirubicin (Ellence).

Gomes is a cardiologist in training at the Hospital Garcia de Orta in Almada, Portugal.

According to Gomes, this is "mainly because a smaller proportion of patients now die from cancer. In the coming years, this cardiotoxicity looks set to increase the burden of heart failure in cancer survivors."

However, she said, "the good news is that cardiotoxicity can be reversible in the early stages before overt heart failure develops."

The new study tracked 83 patients in a hospital surveillance program, including 54 with breast cancer, 20 with lymphoma and nine with gastric cancer. Their average age was 52, and 78 percent were female.

Patients with diabetes showed more signs of the damage that's considered an early warning sign of heart failure. But the study did not prove that the blood sugar disease caused more damage from chemotherapy.

The findings were presented recently at the EuroEcho-Imaging meeting, in Leipzig, Germany.

"Cancer patients should strictly control cardiovascular risk factors with lifestyle changes and, if necessary, with medication," Gomes said in a news release from the European Society of Cardiology. "But, of course, cardiovascular prevention should never postpone the beginning of chemotherapy, since treating cancer is the first priority."

Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

For details on heart disease and cancer, visit the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

SOURCE: European Society of Cardiology, press release, Dec. 10, 2016

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=717701

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Heart
Neoplasms
Heart Failure, Congestive
Drug Therapy
Blood
Specialty Chemicals and Products
Risk
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact