bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Appendicitis
Hernia
Hospitals
Infection
Child
Surgery
 Resources from HONselect
Emergency Surgery Riskier for Kids in Poorer Countries
Seven times more likely to die within 30 days of abdominal procedures for appendicitis, hernias, study finds

By Robert Preidt

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children in poorer countries are much more likely to die after emergency abdominal surgery than those in wealthy nations, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed the outcomes of more than 1,400 children in 43 countries who had emergency abdominal surgery in 2014. The surgeries were for conditions such as appendicitis, congenital abnormalities and hernia.

Compared to children in wealthy countries, those in middle-income nations were four times more likely to die within 30 days of surgery, and those in poor countries were seven times more likely to die, the study found.

Rates of serious complications were just over 11 percent among children in poor countries, compared with just over 6 percent for those in middle-income and rich countries.

Rates of wound infection were 21 percent for children in poor countries, 9.6 percent for those in middle-income countries, and 4.6 percent for those in rich countries.

The findings were published online Dec. 12 in the journal BMJ Global Health.

Surgery is an essential element of health care, so surgical services for children in poor countries need to be improved, said the study team from GlobalSurg, an international collaboration of surgical researchers.

"Good surgical outcomes require a multitude of factors, including trained personnel, good facilities and surgical supplies, as well a prompt access to surgical care," said the study authors. They were led by Dr. Adesoji Ademuyiwa, from the pediatric surgery unit at Lagos University Teaching Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria.

Focusing on one area isn't sufficient, including "well-meaning efforts from high-income countries in the form of 'surgical safaris' by visiting surgical teams, the provision of surgical equipment alone, or short-term training courses outside one's normal work setting," the researchers said in a journal news release.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more on appendicitis.

SOURCE: BMJ Global Health, news release, Dec. 12, 2016

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=717643

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Emergencies
Research Personnel
Hernia
Infection
Equipment and Supplies
Wounds and Injuries
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact