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New Skin Patch Analyzes Your Sweat During Exercise
Used with a smartphone app, it's designed to offer information about your health, inventors say

By Randy Dotinga

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- How much are you really sweating when you exercise? You may not need to wring yourself dry to find out.

Researchers say they've developed a flexible device that sticks to the skin, analyzes your sweat and sends the results to your smartphone.

That's not all. Researchers say the device -- about the size of a quarter -- offers insight into whether you need to drink more water or down an energy drink to boost electrolyte levels.

"The intimate skin interface created by this wearable, skin-like ... system enables new measurement capabilities not possible with the kinds of absorbent pads and sponges currently used in sweat collection," said John Rogers, lead author of a study reporting development of the "lab on the skin."

Rogers is a professor of materials science and engineering, biomedical engineering and neurological surgery at Northwestern University's McCormick School of Engineering in Evanston, Ill.

The device is disposable, designed to be used once for a few hours while attached to the skin of the forearm or back.

Why bother analyzing sweat?

Because, Rogers said in a university news release, it's "a rich, chemical broth containing a number of important chemical compounds with physiological health information."

Researchers tested the device on two groups of cyclists and report their findings Nov. 23 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

They said the device gave accurate accounts of the acidity of sweat and concentrations of glucose, chloride and lactate.

To get the data, a user takes a smartphone photo of the device. An app then analyzes that photo and displays the information.

More information

Try the U.S. National Library of Medicine on sweat.

SOURCES: Northwestern University, press release, Nov. 23, 2016; Science Translational Medicine, Nov. 23, 2016

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=717154

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
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Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
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