bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Smoking
 Resources from HONselect
Tobacco Flavors Draw in Young Folks
Products that taste like cherry or candy seen as less harmful, review finds

By Robert Preidt

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Flavored tobacco products attract young people who also consider them less harmful, researchers say.

The University of North Carolina team reviewed 40 studies conducted in the United States and other countries to assess people's attitudes about non-menthol tobacco flavors such as cherry, cotton candy and coffee.

"We found that flavors for most tobacco products have a universal and rather strong appeal to youth and young adults, and that they were perceived as less harmful among younger people," said review first author Li-Ling Huang in a university news release. She is a research collaborator at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

For example, some of the studies found that cigarette packs without flavor descriptions were less appealing to girls and young women. And a study from the United Kingdom found that teens believed that e-cigarettes with cherry and candy flavors were less harmful than tobacco-flavored e-cigarettes.

Other studies showed that flavors were a common reason why people -- especially teens -- experimented with, progressed to and regularly used tobacco products. The studies showed that users of all ages preferred flavored tobacco products.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned flavored tobacco cigarettes, with the exception of menthol-and-tobacco-flavored cigarettes, in 2009. But there's currently no ban on flavored cigarillos, cigars, hookahs or e-cigarettes in the United States, other than a restriction on the sale of these products to minors.

Banning non-menthol flavors like fruit and candy could reduce use of most tobacco products worldwide, especially among young people, according to the authors of the review that was published in the journal Tobacco Control.

"This review shows that non-menthol flavors in most tobacco products appear to play a vital role in how users and even nonusers perceive, use and continue using tobacco products," said senior author Dr. Adam Goldstein, a professor at the university's School of Medicine Department of Family Medicine.

"Increasingly, countries around the world are interested in -- and some have started -- regulating or banning non-menthol flavors as a way to cut tobacco consumption. This research supports expansion and acceleration of that movement," he added.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on youth and tobacco.

SOURCE: University of North Carolina, news release, Nov. 21, 2016

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=717080

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Smoking
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact