bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Depression
Mental Health
 Resources from HONselect
Depressed Women Less Likely to Get Best Breast Cancer Care: Study
Researchers aren't sure why, but urge doctors to monitor these patients carefully

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients with a history of depression are less likely to receive recommended care for their disease, a new study finds.

The study included more than 45,000 Danish women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer between 1998 and 2011. Of those, 13 percent had been treated with antidepressants and 2 percent had previously visited a hospital for depression.

Compared with those who never took antidepressants, patients who used antidepressants were much less likely to receive recommended breast cancer treatments and had shorter overall survival, according to Dr. Nis Suppli, of the Danish Cancer Society Research Center in Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues.

In addition, the researchers found that antidepressant use was tied to shorter breast cancer-specific survival: five years after cancer diagnosis, 13 percent of patients who used antidepressants had died of breast cancer, compared to 11 percent of those who never took the drugs.

The study authors suggest that the lower survival rate among those who took antidepressants is due to the fact that they are less likely to receive recommended breast cancer treatments.

The findings were published online this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, a publication of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

"These findings suggest that women with prior depression may be vulnerable to receiving sub-standard breast cancer care," said Dr. Harold Burstein, an ASCO expert in breast cancer.

"While the reasons for this are unknown, this study serves as a call for clinicians to provide careful attention to the treatment and follow-up care of this population," Burstein said.

"Women with mental health needs may require assistance in making treatment decisions and navigating the health care system," he added in an ASCO news release.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on breast cancer.

SOURCE: American Society of Clinical Oncology, news release, Nov. 14, 2016

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=716774

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Neoplasms
Breast
Breast Neoplasms
Women
Therapeutics
Depression
Mental Health
Research Personnel
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact