bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Environment
Eye Diseases
Occupational Health
 Resources from HONselect
Lengthy Space Missions May Harm Astronauts' Vision
Problem linked to changes in amount of fluid around the brain and spinal cord, researchers say

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, Nov. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have pinpointed the cause of a vision problem affecting astronauts who have completed long-duration space missions.

The condition -- called visual impairment intracranial pressure (VIIP) -- has been reported by nearly two-thirds of astronauts after extended time on the International Space Station.

The astronauts experienced blurred vision and were found to have structural changes, such as flattening at the back of their eyeballs and inflammation in their optic nerves.

VIIP is caused by changes in the volume of clear fluid found around the brain and spinal cord, according to the study.

"People initially didn't know what to make of it, and by 2010 there was growing concern as it became apparent that some of the astronauts had severe structural changes that were not fully reversible upon return to Earth," study lead author Noam Alperin said in a news release from the Radiological Society of North America. Alperin is a professor of radiology and biomedical engineering at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Identifying the cause of VIIP is expected to aid efforts to protect astronauts during long space missions. NASA is assessing several possible preventive measures.

"If the ocular structural deformations are not identified early, astronauts could suffer irreversible damage. As the eye globe becomes more flattened, the astronauts become hyperopic, or farsighted," Alperin said.

The findings are scheduled for presentation Monday at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, in Chicago. Research presented at medical meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

NASA has more on vision impairment and intracranial pressure.

SOURCE: Radiological Society of North America, news release, Nov. 28, 2016

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=716765

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Astronauts
Missions and Missionaries
Brain
Research Personnel
Eye
Spinal Cord
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact