bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Caffeine
Diabetes Mellitus
Sleep Disorders
 Resources from HONselect
Sugary, Caffeinated Drinks Could Cost You Sleep
Researchers don't know if beverages keep you awake or lack of sleep prompts cravings

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, Nov. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People who get little sleep are likely to drink significantly more sugar-sweetened and caffeinated beverages, a new study finds.

The findings suggest that improving sleep could help reduce people's sugar intake, according to researchers from the University of California, San Francisco.

They analyzed data from nearly 19,000 American adults. Those who regularly slept five or fewer hours a night drank 21 percent more sugar-sweetened, caffeinated beverages like soda and energy drinks than those who slept seven to eight hours a night.

People who regularly slept six hours a night consumed 11 percent more of the drinks than those who got more sleep.

Researchers said they didn't know whether sugary drinks cause people to sleep less, or whether sleep deprivation leads them to consume more sugar and caffeine to stay awake. Previous studies suggest both could be true.

"We think there may be a positive feedback loop where sugary drinks and sleep loss reinforce one another, making it harder for people to eliminate their unhealthy sugar habit," said lead author Aric Prather, an assistant professor of psychiatry.

"This data suggests that improving people's sleep could potentially help them break out of the cycle and cut down on their sugar intake, which we know to be linked to metabolic disease," Prather said in a university news release.

The study found no link between the amount of sleep and consumption of juice, tea or diet drinks. It was published in the December issue of the journal Sleep Health and online Nov. 9.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on sleep.

SOURCE: University of California, San Francisco, news release, Nov. 9, 2016

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=716666

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Sleep
Research Personnel
Adult
Lead
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact