bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Stress
 Resources from HONselect
Lifestyle, Stress May Play Role in Heart Rhythm Disorder
Adopting healthy behaviors might lower risk of atrial fibrillation, study suggests

By Robert Preidt

SATURDAY, Nov. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stress and poor heart-health habits significantly increase the risk of a common heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation, two preliminary studies suggest.

The irregular or quivering heartbeat associated with atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications, the American Heart Association says.

One new study included more than 6,500 adults without heart disease. They were rated on seven factors related to heart health: smoking, body mass index, physical activity, diet, total cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar. The heart association calls these Life's Simple 7.

Compared to those with the worst scores, adults who scored highest were 41 percent less likely to develop atrial fibrillation. Those with average scores were 8 percent less likely to develop the abnormal heartbeat.

Although the findings don't establish a direct cause-and-effect relationship, they suggest that promoting good heart health may prevent atrial fibrillation, said the researchers from Baptist Health South Florida in Miami.

The other study examined the link between stress and atrial fibrillation in more than 26,200 women. Sources of stress included work, family, finances, traumatic events (such as the death of a child), and neighborhood issues.

Women with atrial fibrillation had much higher financial, traumatic life-event and neighborhood stress scores than those without the condition. However, only traumatic life events were associated with atrial fibrillation, according to the study.

The University of California, San Francisco researchers said further studies are needed to determine if stress-relieving measures can reduce the risk of the heart rhythm disorder.

Both studies were presented this week at the American Heart Association's annual meeting, in New Orleans. The results should be considered preliminary until peer-reviewed for publication in a medical journal.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more on atrial fibrillation.

SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, Nov. 15, 2016

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=716611

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Heart
Atrial Fibrillation
Life Style
Role
Association
Blood
Risk
Adult
Research Personnel
Women
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact