bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

  Mouse Study Suggests Way to Stop Poison Ivy's Itch
Blocking protein in immune system kept it from telling brain that skin was irritated

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, Nov. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new method of stopping the itch caused by poison ivy worked well in mice, researchers report.

"Poison ivy rash is the most common allergic reaction in the U.S., and studies have shown that higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are creating a proliferation of poison ivy throughout the U.S. -- even in places where it wasn't growing before," said study senior author Sven-Eric Jordt. He's an associate professor of anesthesiology at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C.

"When you consider doctor visits, the costs of the drugs that are prescribed and the lost time at work or at school, the societal costs are quite large," Jordt added in a Duke news release.

The itch of poison ivy is caused by an oily sap called urushiol, which is also found in poison sumac and poison oak.

In mice with poison ivy rashes, blocking an immune system protein in the skin with an antibody halted the process that tells the brain the skin is itchy, the study found.

This approach might lead to new treatments for the 80 percent of people allergic to poison ivy, the researchers said. But animal research does not always produce similar results in humans.

The study was published Nov. 7 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Each year, more than 10 million people in the United States suffer skin rashes after contact with poisonous plants. While not life-threatening, the condition is painful and results in significant health care costs, Jordt said.

He said some symptoms of skin rashes caused by poison ivy can be eased with antihistamines and steroids.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on poison ivy.

SOURCE: Duke University, news release, Nov. 7, 2016

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=716580

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Brain
Research Personnel
Immune System
Hypersensitivity
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact