bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Back Pain
Travel
 Resources from HONselect
Long Spaceflight Seems to Weaken Spinal Muscles
Astronauts-in-training may benefit from core-strengthening exercises, researcher says

By Robert Preidt

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- After months in space, the muscles supporting an astronaut's spine shrink, a new study finds.

And, the muscles don't return to normal even after the astronaut is back on Earth for several weeks, researchers from the University of California, San Diego, discovered.

But there were no changes in astronauts' spinal disc height, according to the study.

The researchers assessed six NASA astronauts who spent four to seven months on the International Space Station. The researchers said the study offers new insight into increased rates of back pain and spinal disc disease among astronauts on long space missions.

"These findings run counter to the current scientific thinking about the effects of microgravity on disc swelling," said study author Dr. Douglas Chang. He's an associate professor of orthopedic surgery and chief of physical medicine and rehabilitation service at UC San Diego Health.

"Further studies will be needed to clarify the effects on disc height, and determine whether they contribute to the increase in body height during space missions, and to the increased risk of herniated discs," Chang said in a university news release.

"However, it's information like this that could provide helpful information needed to support longer space missions, such as a manned mission to Mars," he added.

He said the results suggest possible ways to reduce the effects of spaceflight on the spine. For example, core-strengthening exercises that are recommended for patients with back pain might benefit astronauts in training.

Also, yoga might help counter spinal stiffness and reduced mobility, Chang added.

The findings were published Oct. 25 in the journal Spine.

More information

The European Space Agency has more on living in space.

SOURCE: University of California, San Diego, news release, Oct. 25, 2016

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=716128

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Muscles
Research Personnel
Missions and Missionaries
Back
Astronauts
Back Pain
Spine
Pain
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact