bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: O S A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Occupational Health
Parenting
Mental Health
 Resources from HONselect
Co-Workers Take Dim View of Women Who Seek Flex Time: Study
But men who seek time for kids are viewed positively, researchers find

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, Aug. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women seeking a better work-life balance are less likely than men to be viewed positively by their colleagues, a new study finds.

"These results demonstrate how cultural notions of parenting influence perceptions of people who request flexible work," said study author Christin Munsch, an assistant professor of sociology at Furman University in Greenville, S.C.

Researchers asked nearly 650 people, aged 18 to 65, to read transcripts of what they were told were conversations between a human resources official and an employee. Some of the employees requested a flexible work arrangement.

These arrangements included asking to work at home in some cases, or to come in early and leave early three days a week in order to care for their children. After reading the transcripts, the participants were asked how likely they were to grant the request and also to evaluate the employee.

When employees asked to work from home for childcare-related reasons, nearly 70 percent of participants said they would be "very likely" or "likely" to approve the request if it was made by a man. But only about 57 percent said they would grant the request when made by a woman.

In these cases, 24 percent of participants said men who made such a request were "extremely likeable," while only 3 percent of participants said women who made such a request were "extremely likeable."

About 15 percent of participants said women who made such a request were "not at all" or "not very" committed to their jobs, while only about 3 percent of participants said the same about men who made such a request.

The study was scheduled for presentation Monday at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association in San Francisco. Data and conclusions presented at meetings are typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

"Today, we think of women's responsibilities as including paid labor and domestic obligations, but we still regard breadwinning as men's primary responsibility and we feel grateful if men contribute in the realm of childcare or to other household tasks," Munsch said in an association news release.

The study also found that both women and men who requested greater work flexibility for childcare-related reasons were viewed more favorably than those who made such requests for other reasons, such as reducing their commute time.

More information

The University of Southern California Center for Work & Family Life has more about family and work balance.

SOURCE: American Sociological Association, news release, Aug. 18, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=690746

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Women
Men
Association
Parenting
Research Personnel
Family
Mental Health
Sociology
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact